Research suggests there is a relationship between historic environments and an individual’s ‘wellbeing’. Those who live in historic environments appear to have higher ‘social capital’ – a term which refers to benefits in terms of wellbeing, good health and civil engagement. Research (also in academia) suggests that such communities tend to be more cohesive and, it has been suggested, tend to be less expensive medically to look after.

Photo: Old Elvet Bridge over the River Wear in the historic city of Durham, England, 2008.
By Roger Smith, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons.

See examples on the Museums and wellbeing alliance blog.